Tag Archives: unusual accents and dialects

“Interstate Farty-Far” (St. Louis English)

It’s easy to prematurely assume that certain rare American dialect features have become extinct. Such is the case with St. Louis‘ “Interstate Farty-Far” quirk, whereby words like “for” and “born ” are pronounced more or less as “far” and “barn” … Continue reading

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Posted in American English | Tagged , | 18 Comments

Northeastern PA’s “Un-Northeastern” Accent

While a college freshman, I assumed one of my classmates to be from Minnesota or Wisconsin (my accent-dar was unsophisticated back then). She hailed from Scranton, Pennsylvania, however, a city a mere two hours from New York City. You might … Continue reading

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Posted in American English | Tagged , | 9 Comments

Joey Barton and “French-English Accents”

By now, I suspect many readers have watched Liverpudlian footballer Joey Barton‘s recent interview about his French debut. I have little to say about his accent, other than to remind everyone that this native Englishman has spent but a few … Continue reading

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Posted in Miscellaneous Accents and Dialects | Tagged , , , | 8 Comments

Whatever Happened to the Northumbrian /r/?

As I’ve previously discussed, English accents exhibit various types of /r/ sounds. Yet few are as peculiar as the /r/ once typical of an accent known as the Northumbrian burr, spoken in rural areas of Northeast England. The burr was notorious … Continue reading

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Posted in British English | Tagged , | 9 Comments

Inner-City Dialects

This week’s Economist features an article about the Kiezdeutsch dialect of German, mostly spoken by inner-city youth. One may recognize controversies similar to those about non-standard English: ‘purists’ argue that Kiezdeutsh is bad/lazy German, while linguists see it is a legitimate variant of … Continue reading

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Posted in Miscellaneous Accents and Dialects | Tagged , , , | 11 Comments

Accents or Dialects I Haven’t Heard

A question I get asked a lot (as anyone with a passion for accents and dialects is probably asked) is whether there are any varieties of English I haven’t heard. There’s no easy answer, of course, since accents aren’t clearly defined … Continue reading

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Posted in Miscellaneous Accents and Dialects | Tagged , , , | 28 Comments

‘Couple Dialects’

Couples speak their own languages.  Whether these could be called ‘dialects’ or not is up for debate. But couples certainly seem to engage in code shifting, the act of changing one’s mode of speech depending on context.  They engage in different … Continue reading

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Posted in Miscellaneous Accents and Dialects | Tagged | 11 Comments

On the Hunt for the New Orleans Yat

Some English dialects are so uncommon that they adopt the mythology of the Loch Ness Monster. One such dialect, unique the city of New Orleans, is locally referred to as Yat. It is renowned not because of how strange it … Continue reading

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Posted in American English | Tagged , , | 15 Comments

How Do Falkland Islanders Speak?

English has a number of isolated speaker communities throughout the world.  Among the most isolated are the Falkland Islands, which comprise a sparsely populated British territory of about 3,000.  To date, I’ve only found one speech sample of someone truly … Continue reading

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Posted in Miscellaneous Accents and Dialects | Tagged , , | 16 Comments

Jill Abramson’s Accent

I’m coming home from vacation Saturday and will hopefully have proper post up by Sunday.  In the meantime, I’d like to address something that has been swirling around the press:  the strange idiolect of new NY Times Executive editor Jill … Continue reading

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Posted in Miscellaneous Accents and Dialects | Tagged , | 28 Comments