Tag Archives: scottish accents

“Americanized” Non-American Novels

I’m reading (and enjoying) my first Inspector Rebus novel, Fleshmarket Alley, by Scottish crime writer Ian Rankin. Non-American Rebus fans may not recognize the book’s American title, as it goes by the more evocative moniker Fleshmarket Close in the UK. Why it must be spelled out … Continue reading

Share

Posted in Miscellaneous Accents and Dialects | Tagged , | 32 Comments

Sean Connery’s /s/

Reader Jason Reid wrote me recently with a thoughtful question about a notorious celebrity quirk of pronunciation: Comedians often imitate Sean Connery by pronouncing /s/ like /?/ (as in she). Does Sean Connery really not make a distinction between those … Continue reading

Share

Posted in English Phonetics | Tagged , , | 15 Comments

The Importance (or not?) of Vowels

Linguist Will Styler has a smart, funny website titled ‘The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Vowels.‘ In the page ‘The Anti-Vowel Agenda,’ he elucidates his gripe: Yet every day, vowels are bought and sold on national television, subjected … Continue reading

Share

Posted in English Phonetics | Tagged , , | 13 Comments

Auld Lang Syne FAQ

Last night was New Years’ Eve, which brings about the yearly revival of the song Auld Lang Syne.  Originally penned by Robert Burns (the melody is traditional), the lyrics are in the Scots language (or dialect, depending on your point of … Continue reading

Share

Posted in British English | Tagged , | 13 Comments

Is the Glasgow Accent Being “Cockneyfied?”

I’ve often discussed Estuary English, the London-influenced accent spreading throughout England. One piece of evidence?  Young people in Glasgow seem to be adopting ‘Cockney’ pronunciations. If the Glasgow accent is indeed becoming more ‘Southeastern,’ this would be a powerful indicator of London’s … Continue reading

Share

Posted in British English | Tagged , , , | 34 Comments

Children’s Accents

Children’s accents tell us quite a bit about adult accents. From the speech of children, we can deduce which sounds of English are easily acquired and which less so.  And in some situations, we can find explanations for why accents … Continue reading

Share

Posted in English Phonetics | Tagged , , | 20 Comments

Ulster Scots and Appalachian English

I’ve had conversations with several commenters about the Scots Irish, and their impact on Appalachian English in the United States. This region was largely settled in the 18th-Century by “ethnically Scottish” immigrants from what is present-day Northern Ireland, hence the … Continue reading

Share

Posted in American English | Tagged | 20 Comments

Swallowed ‘r’ in Glasgow

I have a very quick request, for you budding amateur phoneticians out there. After yesterday’s conversation touched on Glasgow English, I looked for a few samples of this accent on YouTube. Glasgow is perhaps the only city in the English-speaking … Continue reading

Share

Posted in British English | Tagged , , | 6 Comments