Tag Archives: Rhotic vs. Non-Rhotic

How Do Falkland Islanders Speak?

English has a number of isolated speaker communities throughout the world.  Among the most isolated are the Falkland Islands, which comprise a sparsely populated British territory of about 3,000.  To date, I’ve only found one speech sample of someone truly … Continue reading

Share

Posted in Miscellaneous Accents and Dialects | Tagged , , | 16 Comments

Is the Glasgow Accent Being “Cockneyfied?”

I’ve often discussed Estuary English, the London-influenced accent spreading throughout England. One piece of evidence?  Young people in Glasgow seem to be adopting ‘Cockney’ pronunciations. If the Glasgow accent is indeed becoming more ‘Southeastern,’ this would be a powerful indicator of London’s … Continue reading

Share

Posted in British English | Tagged , , , | 34 Comments

The Overlooked Philadelphia Accent

I should really know more about the Philadelphia Accent than I do. I have several friends who live in Philadelphia, my lovely girlfriend was born in the city (and raised nearby), and I’ve lived most of my life in the … Continue reading

Share

Posted in American English | Tagged , , | 46 Comments

When did Americans Stop “Talking British?”

As the title of this post suggests, I often hear questions along the lines of, “when did Americans stop talking like British people?” Many readers, of course, know that history offers no such easy answers. But it’s a topic worth … Continue reading

Share

Posted in American English | Tagged | 87 Comments

The “Trubbow” with L-Vocalization

Listen to a three-year-old say “doll,” and it will probably sound like “dow.”  Along the same lines, a young child’s “trouble” becomes “trubbow,” “fall” becomes “foe,” “bell” becomes “bew.”  Or so it sounds to the average listener.  This  is what is … Continue reading

Share

Posted in English Phonetics | Tagged , , , | 69 Comments

Arrr, Matey! The Origins of the Pirate Accent

Ask people to imitate a pirate, and they instinctually adopt the “pirate accent” immortalized in film and television. This unique brogue is renowned for it’s strong “r” sound, as in “yarrr” and “arrrrr.” Pirate imitators may wonder, “What accent am … Continue reading

Share

Posted in British English | Tagged , , | 39 Comments

R-lessness in the American South: RIP?

Whatever happened to non-rhotic Southern accents? For those of you joining us from the everyday world (one where “non-rhotic” isn’t a household word) a non-rhotic accent is one where the “r” is dropped at the end of words or syllables. … Continue reading

Share

Posted in American English | Tagged , , | 48 Comments

The Wild World of the English “R”

Compared to other languages, consonants in English don’t vary that much from dialect to dialect. Our vowels are all over the map, but our consonants don’t change much. For example, the English “m” hasn’t budged since the days of Old … Continue reading

Share

Posted in English Phonetics | Tagged , | 18 Comments