Tag Archives: Dublin Accents

Faulkner, Joyce, and Regional Modernism

I most associate literary modernism with Joyce and Faulkner, writers who pushed literature’s boundaries further than they had, and perhaps have since, been pushed. Both explored non-standard grammar and syntax, so it’s no coincidence that they were master “dialect writers.” That … Continue reading

Share

Posted in Miscellaneous Accents and Dialects | Tagged , | 3 Comments

The Language of “The Troubles”

When people discuss “accent discrimination,” they usually refer to everyday injustices: being passed up for promotions, denied loans, or scolded in school. Contemporary history, however, suggests more severe examples. In the BBC documentary series Who Do You Think You Are?, … Continue reading

Share

Posted in Irish English | Tagged , | 10 Comments

Different Kinds of “Ah”

In linguist Tom Roeper’s excellent book on language acquisition, The Prism of Grammar, he makes this observation about Boston accents: In Boston, there are two forms of r-lessness, heard in two ways of saying ‘Harvard:’ ‘Hahvid’ and ‘Haavid.’ The first … Continue reading

Share

Posted in Miscellaneous Accents and Dialects | Tagged , , , | 6 Comments

Mother Goose Rhymes (When Accents Collide)

Years ago, I was in a pub discussing a subject I can’t recall. A Dublin acquaintance asked a question that sounded like ‘Was he in coat?’ ‘In coat?’ Was this a dialect term I’d never heard? Did he mean ‘Was he … Continue reading

Share

Posted in English Phonetics | Tagged , | 19 Comments

The Irish ‘Strut’

When English phoneticians refer to the ‘strut vowel,’ they mean the ‘u‘ in ‘luck,’ ‘fudge,’ and ‘cut.’  In American English, the sound usually lies somewhere between the ‘a’ in ‘father’ and the ‘a’ in ‘comma.’  Your ‘strut’ vowel may vary. … Continue reading

Share

Posted in Irish English | Tagged , , | 18 Comments

A Quick Break

I’m going to be computerless for the next two days, so I’m taking a short break from this site. I won’t be a presence in the comments section, but feel free to share! In parting, I’d like to share one … Continue reading

Share

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | 1 Comment

Literary Dialect Transcription

We normally discuss spoken accents or dialects. But what about how they are written? Phonetic transcription isn’t so common in English-language literature these days. And that’s probably for the best. As a reader, I hate it when old novels spell … Continue reading

Share

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 31 Comments

“Um” in Different Accents

All dialects of English have “filler” words. Just to name a few: er, ah, um, eh, or the increasingly common like* and you know. We humans are a hesitant bunch, and these words offer brief moments of reflection. What’s interesting … Continue reading

Share

Posted in English Phonetics | Tagged , , , | 26 Comments

Dem and Dose: “Th” in City Accents

I’ve lived in New York City for thirteen years.  In that time, I’ve learned that living in such an intense urban area has a palpable effect on how one communicates.  You have to talk faster, talk louder, talk more frequently, … Continue reading

Share

Posted in English Phonetics | Tagged , , , | 52 Comments

Supraregional Irish English

I spent Friday night at a gala for the organization my girlfriend works for, a community center created for (and largely run by) Irish immigrants.  As always, it was an accent tour of the Emerald Isle, as folks from Dublin, … Continue reading

Share

Posted in Irish English | Tagged | 18 Comments